Per-Anders Pettersson
July 8, 2013

Features and Essays

Syria is close to having shipped out all of its chemical weapons, U.S. President Barack Obama said Thursday. "Eighty-seven percent of Syria's chemical weapons have already been removed, " Obama said, speaking at a joint press conference in Tokyo, where he is on a state visit. "That is a consequence of U.S. leadership. The fact that we didn’t have to fire a missile to get that accomplished is not a failure to uphold international norms, it’s a success," the President said, stressing that it's not a "complete success until we have the last 13% out." Obama's remarks followed Tuesday's statement from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the group monitoring the destruction of the stockpile of chemical weapons, which said that the June 30 deadline for the complete removal of chemical weapons was within reach. “We hope that the remaining two or three consignments are delivered quickly to permit destruction operations to get underway in time to meet the mid-year deadline for destroying Syria’s chemical weapons," H.E. Mr. Ahmet Üzümcü, the director-general of OPCW, said. The U.S. President's comments also come after accusations by Syrian opposition groups that the Assad regime used chlorine gas against civilians in several attacks the last month. American, British and French government officials have said that there are "strong indications" of gas having been used.
Per-Anders Pettersson

Per-Anders Pettersson: Soweto, the story of South Africa’s transformation (NBC News)

Jehad Nga: Mali (Photo Booth)

Andrew Esiobo: West Africa, as Seen From Its Barbershops (NYT Lens)

Dieter Telemans: Let There Be Light (Panos Pictures) In the centre of the Democratic Republic of Congo, a Hungarian Friar runs an opthalmic clinic and performs hundreds of simple operations on people living in remote communities who have no access to health care or transport to get them to their nearest hospital

Jimmy Nelson: Before They Pass Away (Foreign Policy) For two years, British photographer Jimmy Nelson lugged his 4×5 plate field camera to 44 countries around the globe — from the canopied rain forests of Papua New Guinea to the snowdrifts of northern Mongolia to the searing Namibian desert — documenting a world fast disappearing.

Three foreign doctors working for an American charity in Afghanistan were killed in Kabul on Thursday after being gunned down by a local security guard at a hospital. The vicious assault occurred at the Cure International Hospital on Thursday morning, according to the New York Times. The nationalities of the doctors have yet to be officially released by Afghan authorities. The security guard behind the attack was reportedly shot and injured during the melee. The assault comes weeks after an Afghan police officer opened fire on two AP journalists in the eastern city of Khost in early April. AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed during the shooting and correspondent Kathy Gannon was injured. [NYT]
Adam Dean for TIME Magazine

Adam Dean: When Buddhists Go Bad (LightBox) Buddhism is known for its pacifism and tolerance. But in several Asian nations, monks are inciting bigotry and violence—mostly against Muslims. Photographer Adam Dean traveled to document the growing friction in Thailand and Burma.

Adam Dean: Radical Buddhism Ascendant in Myanmar (NYT)

Bruno Barbey: Burma (Magnum Photos)

Kevin Frayer: Bangladesh collapse left many amputees (NBC News photoblog)

Alessandro Grassani / LUZ Photo

Alessandro Grassani: From nomad to climate refugee (CNN Photoblog) Mongolian climate refugees

Zhang Kechun: Yellow River (BBC) Chengdu-based artist Zhang Kechun has spent two years photographing from the banks of the Yellow River, creating a set of subtly toned large format images. Here swimmers hold a portrait of Chairman Mao as they swim across the river in Henan province.

Syria is close to having shipped out all of its chemical weapons, U.S. President Barack Obama said Thursday. "Eighty-seven percent of Syria's chemical weapons have already been removed, " Obama said, speaking at a joint press conference with the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the first day of his Asia trip. "That is a consequence of U.S. leadership. The fact that we didn’t have to fire a missile to get that accomplished is not a failure to uphold international norms, it’s a success," the President said, stressing that it's not a "complete success until we have the last 13% out." Obama's remarks followed Tuesday's statement from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the group monitoring the destruction of the stockpile of chemical weapons, which said that the June 30 deadline for the complete removal of chemical weapons was within reach. “We hope that the remaining two or three consignments are delivered quickly to permit destruction operations to get underway in time to meet the mid-year deadline for destroying Syria’s chemical weapons," H.E. Mr. Ahmet Üzümcü, the director-general of OPCW, said. The U.S. President's comments also come after accusations by Syrian opposition groups that the Assad regime used chlorine gas against civilians in several attacks the last month. American, British and French government officials have said that there are "strong indications" of gas having been used.
FT Magazine, 29-30 June 2013

Simon Norfolk: Afghanistan (FT magazine) After winning the Prix Pictet Commission, photographer Simon Norfolk follows the cycle of the seasons in Bamyan province in the country’s Central Highlands

Joel van Houdt : Afghanistan’s New Rich (Guardian) A tiny elite in Afghanistan enjoys a lavish lifestyle, including glittering new apartments, shopping malls and celebrations at luxury wedding halls

Jacob Aue Sobol: Arrivals and Departures: A Trans-Siberian Journey (Photo Booth)

Yuri Kozyrev: Far East Russia (NOOR)

Oksana Yushko: Balaklava, The Lost History (burn magazine) An exploration of the minds of people who were born in the USSR

Claudine Doury: Pagan rituals celebrate Russian summer (CNN Photoblog)

Rena Effendi: A Fairy Tale in Transylvania (NYT Lens)

José Antonio de Lamadrid: Living Life as Brothers: Photographing Triplets with Autism (LightBox)

No wreckage from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has been spotted by the unmanned submarine currently scouring the Indian Ocean seabed, despite 90% of the focused search area already having been examined and a search of the remaining fraction underway. On Thursday, Bluefin-21 was deployed around 1,000 miles northwest of Perth, but the U.S.-made submersible has found nothing of interest. Also on Thursday, yet another possible clue got discounted, as a metal object washed ashore on Australia's west coast was examined and deemed not from the errant jet, adding to the hundreds of erroneous items spotted by satellite, plane and ship so far. It has now been 48 days since the Boeing 777 disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board. “I’m just trying to reconcile the fact that we haven’t seen anything yet, but we heard those pings,” Jules Jaffe, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, tells TIME, referring to signals believed to have come from the black box data recorders of the missing plane. “The other hypothesis is that the debris field is quite large.” Small pieces of wreckage spread over a large area will hamper investigators attempting to fathom what prompted the 11-year-old aircraft to go tragically off-course. Other than the black box flight and voice recorders, says Michael Daniel, an international aviation-safety consultant with more than three decades experience at the FAA, the “direction of the flaps, angles and controls, will show intent on how to land the aircraft.” Such clues may not be available if the plane hit the ocean hard and splintered into many fragments. Assuming that the remaining Bluefin search proves fruitless, investigators will have to decide how best to proceed. Four pings were heard from the depths of the southern Indian Ocean. The current focused search area forms a 10 km-radius circle around the second of these pings, which has been deemed the most promising. The decision to be made is whether to expand the search area incrementally from this same point, move to some of the other ping locations or reevaluate the entire operation. An answer is expected early next week after discussions between Angus Houston, the 66-year-old retired Australian Air Chief Marshall currently coordinating joint search operations, the Malaysian authorities and other stakeholders. “Where they sensed the location of the pings and the strength of the pings, they’ll use different forms of triangulation and try to isolate a more probable area,” says Daniel. “It all helps but may not give a definitive answer for where the aircraft is.” In any case, new assets will almost certainly be brought in to assist the hunt. The Remus 6000 is one possibility — this unmanned autonomous submarine first located doomed Air France Flight 447 in over 4 km-deep water of the Pacific Ocean, and has the ability to descend 2 km farther. But towed sonar locators, such as the Orion device operated by the U.S. Navy, many prove superior, as they can operate around the clock and provide real-time imagery without the laborious resurfacing and downloading of data. Certainly, says Jaffe, “The worst idea in the world is sticking a manned submersible down there because the target is so small [compared to the search area].” On Thursday, up to 11 military aircraft and 11 ships were on hand to continue the hunt for debris. Air operations had been curtailed earlier in the week due to Tropical Cyclone Jack, and though it has now passed by the search zone, miserable conditions continue in its wake, with torrential rain, low cloud, winds up to 35 knots and sea swells of four meters, with visibility at just one kilometer. As the hunt for MH370 enters yet another stage, already the most costly in aviation history, one certainty is that these fruitless forays will cease very shortly.
Moises Saman / Magnum Photos

Moises Saman: Syrian Refugee Children (Daily Mail) Also on BBC website here and a wider selection of Saman’s Syrwork on his agency’s website here

Newsha Tavakolian: Iran: A Nation Eager to Be Heard (LightBox) Based in Tehran, photographer Newsha Tavakolian spent a week on assignment for TIME documenting the run-up to Iran’s elections.

Mohammed Salem: Gaza’s summer camps (Reuters Full Focus) Related on Reuters photoblog here

Lynsey Addario: A Milestone for Israel’s President Shimon Peres (NYT)

Maciek Nabrdalik: The Last Holocaust Survivors (Slate Behold)

Mads Nissen

Mads Nissen: Amazonas (Berlingske)

Joakim Eskildsen: Cuban Evolution (LightBox) Traveling to Cuba on assignment for TIME, Danish photographer Joakim Eskildsen spent 10 days in the Caribbean nation documenting the twilight of the Castro era.

João Pina: Brazil’s Protests (Photo Booth)

Jorge Santiago: Hoop Dreams in Oaxaca’s Hills (NYT Lens)

Larry Towell: Idle No More (Magnum Photos) Native American community in Ontario, Canada

Jon Lowenstein: Getting back to nature in Gary, Indiana (NBC News) Battered city of Gary, Ind., considers shrinking 40 percent to save itself

Jan Banning: The Faces of Homelessness (Slate Behold) Beyond Stereotypes

John Pendygraft: Savannah’s Journey (zReportage)

David Walter Banks: The Myth and Mystery of the Sunshine State (LightBox) Florida

Eirik Johnson: Barrow Cabins (Feature Shoot) Alaskan Structures in Summer and Winter

Jane Hilton: The Precious Women of Nevada’s Brothels (Slate Behold)

Margaret LeJeune: At Home With the Huntress (Slate Behold) Photographs of female hunters

Katie Orlinsky: The Aqualillies (Reportage by Getty Images) The Aqualillies are an underwater dance troupe that has merged the art of ballet with the athleticism of synchronised swimming.

Brian Powers: Portraits of the Chicago Sun-Times photography department (CNN Photoblog)

Camille Seaman: The Big Cloud (TED blog) collection of storm photos

Articles

Stud 7 and Sima Film

The Making of Boogie’s Demons Project (Dva Foto) Serbian photographer Boogie, known for his street photography from all over the world, has been working on a series of wet-plate collodion portraits in his hometown of Belgrade over the last few years, a project that he calls “Demons”.

Photography Legend Robert E. Gilka, 96 (NPPA) Gilka, a newspaper photographer and editor who was a mentor to legions of photographers and who was the director of photography for National Geographic Magazine for more than 27 years passed away

Bert Stern, Elite Photographer Known for Images of Marilyn Monroe, Dies at 83 (NYT) Also, on LightBox here

Greg Marinovich : Documenting apartheid, ‘one long nightmare’ (CNN Photoblog) South African photographer Greg Marinovich spent years covering the rise of violence in his home country before the eventual death of the systemic racial discrimination policy of apartheid. During the transition to democracy, he found himself on the front lines of history.

Spotlight Story
'Without Empathy, Nothing Works.' Chef José Andrés Wants to Feed the World Through the Pandemic
Celebrity chef José Andrés is focused on feeding Americans affected by coronavirus. Here's how he plans to do it.

A Monday in Kabul (Philip&Hugo Vimeo) video 7 mins | In March 2013 photographer Marieke van der Velden went to Afghanistan to make a photo documentary. She had a simple question: what is your favorite place of your city?

The month in photography – audio slideshow (Guardian) See the best of Arles Photography Festival in July’s guide to the top photography around the world, with Guy Bourdin, John Stezaker and more. Elsewhere, there’s work by Erwin Blumenfeld and Vanessa Winship.

Kathy Ryan: Three Venerable Names From the Art World: Chuck Close, James Turrell and Polaroid Film (NYT magazine 6th Floor blog)

The Story Behind the Shocking Pepper-Spray Photo (New York Magazine: Daily Intelligencer)

Robert Hariman On Daniel Etter’s Viral Taksim Square Protest Photo (BagNewsNotes)

A photographer’s view of the Turkish protests (BBC)

Abo al-Nur Sadk: Another Day in Aleppo (AFP Correspondent blog)

Myanmar bans Time magazine for story about monk (AP)

A Pulitzer Prizewinner Lucian Perkins’s Photos of the Early DC Punk Scene (Mother Jones)

Life on the Streets: Sergio Larrain at Rencontres (LightBox)

Top of the blocks: the world’s strangest war memorials – in pictures (Guardian) Dotted around the former Yugoslavia are some of the world’s most remote second world war memorials, placed there by Tito to commemorate battle sites. From 2006 to 2009, photographer Jan Kempenaers scoured the countryside to find them all – on show now at London’s Breese Little gallery | more on Guardian’s photoblog here

Radcliffe Roye : Bringing Invisible Stories to Instagram (NYT Lens)

Elaine Mayes’s Autolandscapes of the American Road (LightBox)

In Flight, John White Shares His Light (NYT Lens)

Announcing the 2013 Aaron Siskind Foundation Grant Winners (LightBox)

John Perkins’ best photograph – an Egyptian lion-tamer (Guardian)

In Flight, John White Shares His Light (NYT Lens)

Syria is close to having shipped out all of its chemical weapons, U.S. President Barack Obama said Thursday. "Eighty-seven percent of Syria's chemical weapons have already been removed, " Obama said, speaking at a joint press conference with the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the first day of his Asia trip. "That is a consequence of U.S. leadership. The fact that we didn’t have to fire a missile to get that accomplished is not a failure to uphold international norms, it’s a success," the President said, stressing that it's not a "complete success until we have the last 13% out." Obama's remarks followed Tuesday's statement from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the group monitoring the destruction of the stockpile of chemical weapons, which said that the June 30 deadline for the complete removal of chemical weapons was within reach. “We hope that the remaining two or three consignments are delivered quickly to permit destruction operations to get underway in time to meet the mid-year deadline for destroying Syria’s chemical weapons," H.E. Mr. Ahmet Üzümcü, the director-general of OPCW, said. The U.S. President's comments also come after accusations by Syrian opposition groups that the Assad regime used chlorine gas against civilians in several attacks the last month. American, British and French government officials have said that there are "strong indications" of gas having been used.
Kieran Dodds / Panos

Featured photographer: Kieran Dodds (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Anthony Delgado (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Adrian Fussell (Verve Photo)

Kathy Ryan: Office Romance: A Post-It Note Is a Post-It Note Is a Post-It Note (NYT magazine 6th Floor blog)

Destination Cuba: Alongside empty seat 17A (Reuters photoblog) Reuters photographer Maxim Shemetov on the fruitless flight to Cuba

Pakistani Photographers Take A Personal Picture Of Home (NPR Picture Show)

Group mentality: How photographers can join forces to tackle the market (BJP)

Pop-up Shop Brings Indie Photo Books to Brooklyn Subway Travelers (PDN Pulse)

From hard copy to e-book (BBC) For the publishers of photographic books, the rise of digital publishing presents its own unique challenges

Interviews and Essays

Just how low would he go? In Nov. 2009, as Barack Obama shook hands in Tokyo with Japan’s Emperor Akihito, the U.S. President bowed his head deeply in the Japanese tradition. The deferential greeting kicked up a mini-firestorm back in the U.S., with right-wing Americans chastising Obama for somehow submitting to a foreign power. On April 24, Obama, on an Asian tour that was delayed by last fall’s U.S. government shutdown, again met with Japan’s Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko. No deep bows were in evidence this time. Instead, Obama used the morning meeting at Tokyo’s Imperial Palace for a little levity, joking that in the intervening four years, his hair had turned gray. “You have a very hard job,” the Emperor responded. Obama is kicking off his four-nation Asia trip with a state visit to Japan, where he is underscoring the allies’ security ties and pushing for a trade pact that faces hurdles in both Washington and Tokyo. While the President will not stop in China this time around, Beijing’s growing regional footprint will surely be a matter of discussion in all the countries he will visit: Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines. All of these nations are currently involved in territorial disputes with China, mostly over tiny uninhabited bits of rock in contested waters. One of the conflicts involves islets in the East China Sea that Japan administers but to which China lays claim. Since the Japanese government nationalized some of the outcrops in 2012, maritime and aerial confrontations between Beijing and Tokyo have increased significantly. The U.S. says that it does not take a stand on who actually owns the scattering of rocks, called the Senkaku in Japanese and the Diaoyu in Mandarin. But speaking at a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo Thursday, the U.S. President for the first time acknowledged in press cthat the disputed islands are covered by the security treaty that commits the U.S. to defending Japan should it come under attack. Japan’s postwar constitution, which was written by the occupying Americans, emphasizes a commitment to peace from a former imperial aggressor that marched across Asia during the first half of the last century. The charter precludes Japan from possessing a normal military, and it has never been amended — a rare, untouched document among democracies today. The proudly patriotic Abe, who has a rare electoral mandate after the country cycled through six leaders in as many years, wants to change the constitution (or at least the interpretation of it) in order to enable the establishment a more conventional army. Specifically, he wants to allow for what’s called “collective self-defense,” in which Japan can help defend an ally under attack, like a U.S. ship from a North Korean missile, for example. Local polls, however, show that many Japanese aren’t convinced by Abe’s wish for constitutional revision. As the Pacific’s policeman, the U.S. has helped keep regional peace for decades. Obama has made clear his intentions to rebalance American foreign policy toward the Asia-Pacific. But with regional tensions increasing, amid China’s more assertive defense of its territorial claims, a little back-up from an Asian ally wouldn’t be unwelcomed by America. Under Abe, Japan’s defense spending has begun to increase slightly after an 11-year lull. While Japan can only form a defensive armed forces, its military spending is the world’s sixth largest. In remarks before Abe and Obama’s bilateral meeting on Thursday morning, the Japanese Prime Minister noted that “the alliance between these two nations is indispensable and irreplaceable as the foundation for a peaceful and prosperous Asia-Pacific region.” On Thursday afternoon, Obama will visit Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine, a top tourist site and sacred spot in Japan’s indigenous Shinto faith. Two days before, another North American made headlines by visiting an altogether more controversial Shinto place of worship in Tokyo. Canadian pop star Justin Bieber posted pictures online of his stop at Yasukuni Shrine, where the souls of 2.5 million Japanese war dead are enshrined, among them top war criminals responsible for Japan’s military expansion across Asia. The Yasukuni complex also houses a war history museum that downplays atrocities committed by Japanese soldiers. Bieber’s visit earned him the wrath of Chinese fans, and he quickly apologized for causing any offense. Last December, on the one-year anniversary of his latest stint as PM, Abe became the first Japanese leader since 2006 to visit Yasukuni. The pilgrimage earned him an expression of “disappointment” from the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo. (At the Thursday press conference with Obama, Abe explained that his visit was to honor the war dead in general, not war criminals.) On April 22, one day before Obama arrived in Japan, nearly 150 Japanese legislators visited Yasukuni, spurring a furious response from Chinese and South Korean officials. Emperor Akihito’s father, Hirohito (known in Japan as the Showa Emperor), used to pay homage at Yasukuni. But he stopped visiting after 1978 when 14 top war criminals’ names were added to the shrine’s honor rolls. Emperor Akihito has not paid his respects at Yasukuni, either — a pointed absence by a figure venerated in state Shinto, a version of the faith that focuses heavily on imperial worship. Obama will meet with Emperor Akihito two more times during his Japan visit, once at a Thursday dinner and another time at a farewell on Friday before the U.S. President heads to South Korea. It’s a pretty safe bet that Obama won’t be breaking out any low bows at either occasion.
port-magazine.com

Six Photographs: René Burri (Port-magazine) Matt Willey talks to the legendary Magnum photographer about six of his most iconic and interesting photographs, from Picasso to the reopening of the Suez Canal…

Susan Meiselas (Look3) Meiselas in conversation with David Levi Strauss

Michael Nichols (Look3) Nichols in Conversation with David Quammen

Josef Koudelka (PDN) Koudelka on the Measure of a Photographer, Courage, and Controlling Your Own Destiny

Henri Cartier-Bresson: Part 1: Living and Looking Part 2: ‘There Are No Maybes’ (NYT Lens)

Chris Steele-Perkins Can’t Let Go of England (Vice)

Paul Conroy (Monocle 24) audio | starts at 10 minutes in

Grazia Neri : The Lady of Photography (Le Journal de la Photographie)

Platon (New Republic) About that Rand Paul Cover Photo… A Conversation with Platon

Annie Leibovitz (Guardian) Leibovitz on the future of photography

Diana Markosian (Le Journal de la Photographie) My father, the stranger

How much can someone learn about you by accessing your Facebook data? Not just your friends and interests, but also who stalks you, where you spend your time and even how much money you make. That’s the setup for a new website called Digital Shadow promoting the upcoming spy video game Watch Dogs by Ubisoft. Give the site authorization to scrape your Facebook profile for data, and it will list your “pawns” (your closest friends that can be used against you), “obsessions” (the people you Facebook creep on the most) and “scapegoats” (people you don’t interact with and would willingly sacrifice if necessary). The sleek dossier also includes photos of places you hang out, data on when you post most often, and a series of guesses at your password based on the things you write about most often. Of course, all this “creepy” insight is based on information you willingly gave to Facebook at some time or another. Letting Watch Dogs scour your profile can act as a sobering reminder that the information you put on the Internet can potentially be used against you.
The Photographers' Gallery

Chris Killip (The Photographers’ Gallery Vimeo)

Bill Eppridge (Vimeo) The Importance of the Still Image

Kai Wiedenhöfer (Vice) Wiedenhöfer Hates Walls, but He Photographs Them Anyway

Aristide Economopoulos (PDN) Economopoulos on his award winning Sandy coverage

Per-Anders Pettersson (NBC News) Chronicling post-apartheid South Africa through one township’s story

Richard Misrach (Look3) Misrach in conversation with Alex Chadwick

Gregory Crewdson (Look3) Crewdson in conversation with Alex Chadwick

10 questions with photographer Pablo López Luz (Ventana Latina)

In the Photographer’s Studio: Andrea Gjestvang (WPO YouTube)

Antonio Olmos (Vignette magazine) Olmos on his The Landscape of Murder project

Maciej Dakowicz (Japan Camera Hunter)

David Stewart (Feature Shoot) Steward Discusses Film, Teens, and the Current Climate in Ad Photography


Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


Contact us at editors@time.com.

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